RSS

Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions

May 6, 2011

Security, Self Defense

The end of the world as we know it (TEOTWAWKI) will, of course, bring with it many now unfathomable changes in our daily lives.

Cellphones, computers, and other items currently considered necessities may have little value in the world to come. Conversely, other items now considered trivial may become prominent and indispensable tools for survival.

It’s important for the prepper to consider the long term usefulness of any purchase. Evaluate each purchase in terms of its pre- and post- TEOTWAWKI usefulness.

For example, let’s consider a handgun for personal protection.

Before TEOTWAWKI

As the world edges closer toward a tipping point, societal changes are occurring all around us. The world is a much more dangerous place than it was just ten or twenty years ago.

Where permitted, many citizens have taken to arming themselves for protection. In one gathering of preppers, over ninety percent of the four dozen people had a Concealed Carry Permit.

My preferred choice for an everyday carry weapon is the Ruger LCP. It’s a small, light-weight pistol that packs enough umph to dissuade any would-be attackers. Commonly referred to as a Get-Off-Me gun, the .380 LCP is a good combination of size and power for the modern prepper.

After TEOTWAWKI

A post-TEOTWAWKI weapon, however is judged by very completely different set of criteria.

Post TEOTWAWKI, there will likely be more lawlessness and less police and governmental support. Unprepared people will be hungry and desperate. Smaller caliber weapons will be less of a deterrent. A larger calibre will be preferred; it has more stopping power.

Additionally, there will be little benefit to concealing your weapon. In fact, it may be safer if you carry your handgun strapped to your side for all to see. Hopefully that will persuade an attacker to select another, less prepared victim.

And third, the availability of ammunition must be taken into consideration. The .380 calibre ammo may be found now, but it’s certainly less common and not as plentiful as other calibres.

I’ve adopted the Springfield Armory XD-40 Service pistol as my weapon of choice for after TEOTWAWKI. It’s well made, durable, and easy to shoot. The .40 calibre packs a significant punch and ammunition is relatively plentiful and inexpensive now. With the popularity of the calibre, if any ammunition can be found after TEOTWAWKI I suspect the .40 calibre may be among it.

A Changed World

Although it’s difficult to predict with any certainty what the post-TEOTWAWKI world will be like, we do know that it’ll be significantly different than the world in which we live now.

As you make your prepping and purchasing decisions, make sure you consider not only this world, but the world to come as well.

Related Posts

,

73 Comments on “Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions”

  1. Jarhead Survivor Says:

    Good article. I sold my beloved .44 cal S&W (Modely 29) and used the money to buy a .40 cal S&W magazine fed awhile back. The price for the .44 ammo was killing me!

    Reply

    • Joe Says:

      Ouch, Jarhead Survivor. I know that must have a been a gut-wrenching decision. Probably a good one though in the long run, especially when/if TEOTWAWKI visits.

      Reply

  2. Hawkeye Pierce Says:

    Stick to the Military calibers. They are and will be the most available rounds……9mm, .45, .38, for handguns. And for rifles; 7.62×39(AK47 ammo)
    .223/5.56( AR15 ammo), .308/7.62×52, and 7.62×54(Russian Mosin/Dragaonov ammo)

    And don’t forget that feeding your family will be a major priority. Owning a .22 rifle and a 12gauge shotgun will keep you fed through most situations.

    Cheap, reliable guns are available for the budget buyer. it is best to own more than one gun:

    Rifle: Mosin Nagant =, under $150

    Shotgun: Mossberg 500(or simalar). under $300.

    HiPoint .45ACP: under $165

    MagTech 7022: .22 rifle for under $150

    and NEVER forget the AK47….can be found all over town for around $450……
    Zombie Slaying Meat Gun

    Reply

    • Joe Says:

      Good insight, Hawkeye. Staying with a military calibre makes sense.

      In my research, I opted for the .40 calibre since it has better ballistics than the 9mm and is currently just as widely available at a comparable price. Hopefully this will continue to be the case.

      Adding a .22LR and a 12-gauge shotgun (along with a 30-30 as I recommended in a previous article) will go a long way toward putting food on your table. But I’d caution against relying too much on what we can hunt and gather after TEOTWAWKI. A lot of people who haven’t prepped with be depending on that source of food and I suspect it’ll get scarce quickly.

      Thanks for the comments.

      Joe

      Reply

      • Torrak Says:

        .40 is a common police caliber so it should be plentiful in this type of scenario (at least as plentiful as ammo can be).

        Reply

        • Joe Says:

          please remember with a XD and a XDM you can buy a after market barrel for a 40 sw that will allow it to shoot 9mm and they can load in the same magazines two differnt ammo’s thought the one gun

          Reply

    • Jarhead Survivor Says:

      One other thing I like is a good bow with a dozen arrows. If you live in an area like mine – lots of woods and rural – you can do some hunting with these and if you’re careful you can even get your arrow back. We’ve got more turkeys than you can shake a stick at around right now. They’d probably disappear fairly quick once TSHTF for any length of time, but it’s comforting to know there’s plenty of game around for now.

      Reply

    • hvaczach Says:

      Couldn’t agree more 9mm 45 acp and .357/.38 special cheap available and common. Only thing I add to your rifle calibers is 30-06 cheap, and very popular sporting caliber large enough for the biggest north american big game and deadly accurate at 300 plus yards. Light recoil for a larger caliber. And the 7400 remington with 10 round mags will substitute an AR-15 nicely if needed as a battle rifle, more suited for hunting but for someone who can afford only 1 rifle at this point in time its a very viable option as a dual use weapon

      Reply

  3. Sean McKee Says:

    I am close to you. I have a S&W 380 bodyguard and a Springfield XD 45 (5″)

    Reply

  4. Bud Says:

    I agree with sticking to the “military” rounds since they will be plentiful after the schumer hits the fan just as they are now. I’ve built my arsenal around the 7.62×39 for rifle and 9mm for handgun. I do have a good .22 rifle as well and a Ruger GP100 for “extra” power should the need arise. Everyday carry is a P-64 in 9mm Makarov.

    Reply

  5. Clay Says:

    I’m a shooter and have been all my life. My wife is a shooter… better than me, even though she came to it later in life.

    When the SHTF, you should NOT rely on being able to find ammunition anywhere but in your own storage/caches. Weapons and ammunition will become scarce and VERY expensive VERY quickly…. Look at what happened in 2008.

    So… “post-SHTF availability” caliber considerations are not the chief concern. Choose caliber based on availability and cost NOW…. Also, consider the trade-offs between capacity, weight of a basic load (how much you can carry and at what cost in mobility and performance at what energy cost), and what you can/can’t do with it.

    Rules:
    You never have too many weapons.
    You never have too much ammunition.

    We have many and multiple calibers of rifles, pistols, and shotguns, but I think i would consider the following a minimum in a SHTF situation:

    .22 cal – 1 rifle and 1 pistol per person in your group. At least one of them should have a scope good enough to repeat when dialing up/down in elevation. 1 .22cal pistol per person in your group… at least one should have a decent red dot on it (C-more or Aimpoint… 3.5/4mil is a good all round dot size… I can regularly engage 4″ targets out to 60 yards with a 4 mil Aimpoint)

    .380 or 9mm – Now that Ruger makes the LC9, I’d have one of these for each person as a backup/concealed carry.

    .40 cal – 1 per person in group minimum. I’ve had/shot 9mm, 40, 45, et al. This is your main open carry personal protection weapon (after rifle/shotgun/et al.) Ammo and components for this caliber are best bang/buck et al.

    “.45 cal” – If you can swing it, have one 1911 or 2011 with a 460 Roland conversion (barrel and comp drop in, different cartridge). This weapon can “solve” any problem up close to include large feral hogs, bears, etc.

    .223/5.56 – 1 AR-type Rifle per person in your group. Carbines are “OK”, but at least one person should have an HB w/ bipod and good glass and be trained to use it to “solve” long-distance problems.

    .308/30-06 – AR type preferable if it’s accurate; otherwise a Rem 700 type bolt-action with good glass.

    .50 cal – (Optional) BUT, if you can secure one of these per 10 folks in your group, you will be able to protect/influence a much larger “safety zone” in your local territory. The semi-auto Barret is readily available.

    Shotguns – I prefer auto-loaders in 12GA, but I’m trained. Pumps are generally recommended for defense… I also have over-unders for hunting too. Sub-gauges…. If you want ‘em (to train younger children… a 20GA or a 410 for less than 8 years).

    ALL rifles (except .50 cal and 5.56/.308 with bipods) should be fitted with military slings, and you should know how to use them in at least the prone, sitting, and standing positions (See appleseed.org to find out how to learn.)

    EVERY person in your group should be proficient in firing and maintenance of all weapons. Every person should be able to put six rounds on target in six seconds at 25 yards with a pistol (minimum), and EVERY person should get their “Rifleman” patch from appleseed.org.

    Now… ammunition. You can buy and store ammo if you want, but I would highly recommend getting set up to reload in every caliber and gauge you plan to have post-SHTF. You can choose multi-use powders (Tightgroup and Clays, etc.) and acquire/store all components as you have funds to do so.

    I have enough to supply my requirements and enough to produce for others (major source of trading for what I might need).

    Reply

    • Joe Says:

      That’s a nice list, Clay. I definitely agree with you about post TEOTWAWKI availability. Choosing a calibre that more common now will likely give you a better chance of find ammunition for it later on, but I would not depend on it.

      The only advice I’d offer is that people should use prudence when acquiring weapons. Acquire them as you can, but not to the exclusion of other supplies like the proverbial beans, band-aids, etc.

      Thanks for chiming in!

      Joe

      Reply

      • Clay Says:

        You can’t “depend” on anything post TEOTWAWKI…. that’s why I recommend to set up to reload own and store components.

        Your recommendation for “prudence” is right on point… Prudence in all… Weapons selection, ammo, et al should be put in priority with the other requirements…. Maybe I should put priority #s on my list…

        Reply

        • Joe Says:

          Reloading is something that I haven’t gotten into….yet. But I’m definitely feeling like it’s something that I need to do.

          Thanks again for the comments.

          Joe

          Reply

  6. Sunflower Says:

    I have a Ruger LCP (.380). Anyone have a hint on how to keep lint from filling up near front sights?

    It is a conceal carry. I leave the clip in full time except to clean. I do not clean it often (maybe every couple months after practice).

    Thanks.

    Reply

    • Joe Says:

      When I carry a Ruger LCP-380 or Kel-Tek 3AT style of pistol, I expect to have to clean it regularly. This is particularly true when I carry in the front pants pocket. They just seem to be lint magnets.

      Joe

      Reply

      • Stu C. Says:

        You could try a nice pocket holster, it helps disguise the outline and keeps lint from getting in the nooks and crannies. Works well with my j-frame and pf9

        Reply

        • Joe Says:

          I do have a Galco pocket holster. That helps to hold the pistol upright for easy access but doesn’t really help with the lint issue.

          Reply

  7. Sunflower Says:

    Anyone know of a shotgun available on the market that can hold more than 10 pops of shot?

    Reply

  8. dan Says:

    Pre TEOTWAWKI I choose the Kel Tec P-11 with 12 round magazines. Post TEOTWAWKI I choose the Sig Sauer P226 .40

    Reply

  9. anieb Says:

    your blog is too good and it is very informative for us.

    40 cal ammo | 40 ammo

    Reply

  10. David L Says:

    Additionally, the smaller EDC like a 380 would make an excellent back-up gun post-SHTF. My “winter” carry is either a 1911 Springfield Commander or a Glock 30. The 380 is perfect for summer with shorts and a light t-shirt.

    Buy quality, it may have to last a long time!

    Reply

  11. rumcrook Says:

    quality guns at a good price for stocking your own personal armory would be cz 75 surplus had for as little as 300 bucks, with a kadet .22 kit will allow lots of training and in 9mm it is cost effective to stockpile, the sigma can be had for around 325 new online, and glocks can be outfitted with a .22 conversion top end also for training with cheap .22

    Reply

  12. Explo Says:

    I would like to praise your desicion on your choise of a .40 cal, instead of the usual 9mm or .45. I’m not taking anything away from either pistol, but with the .40 you get the best of both cal.s. It’s faster than the .45 and it hits harder than the 9mm. What could be better?

    Reply

    • Joe Says:

      Explo – that’s exactly why I chose the .40 cal; it’s got good characteristics of both the 9mm and the .45. My only concern is the availability of ammo in the event of TEOTWAWKI.

      Joe

      Reply

      • anonymous Says:

        Well, the ammo is pretty cheap. Cheaper than Dirt Ammo .40 S&W Winchester USA 165 Grain FMJ Bullet 1,060 fps 100 Rounds USA40SWVP $42.59 Stock up!

        Reply

        • Joe Says:

          Yes, the .40 cal is about the same price as the 9mm from what I’ve seen.

          Reply

          • Hvaczach Says:

            Why does the .40 get so much love overpriced and under powered I don’t hate the round “it’s not a 380″ but still 9mm with the newer ammo cheap to shoot and effective with way less recoil than 40 smith and if u want better ballistics and accuracy 1911 in 45 acp or 357 in a revolver won’t get brand specific personally love Taurus autos lots of shoot for half the price of s&w or glock and never had a jam own three of them a millennium pro a 1911 and a .38 revolver all pretty accurate and dependable

            Reply

            • Joe Says:

              Not sure what you mean by overpriced and under powered, hvaczach. The price is more or less equivalent to that of the 9mm, yet it’s more powerful. Am I misunderstanding something?

              I agree, the .45 ACP is a great calibre.

              Thanks!

              Joe

              Reply

              • shockanawe Says:

                They are all underpowered. Hornady has to come out with new super-exotic, 45+p plastic fuzed, unobtatium impregnated, embossed, terminal pressure gouge your pocket book round just to defeat sheet metal barriors? what at joke. cheap lead (prefer jackets)out of a 180 grain 10mm traveling 1300 fps will defeat multiple obstacles and still be on target with enough retained energy/weight to kick more butt more than your .380 subsonic short, 38 “special”Ed, 9mm lugger, or 40 Short&Wimpy. That Zombie you might need to take down might not be scared after the ineffective bullets failed to terminate it. then what? are you willing to die because your pistol won’t stop them? I’m upset glock doesn’t make a 10mm magnum, and the Gaudy Desert Eagle only holds 7 rounds.

                Reply

              • Hvaczach Says:

                Did some checking today and while premium ammo around the same price in my local stores 9mm in ball ammo in bulk running at least 2.50 per50 rounds cheaper local I don’t buy online and 9mm ball ammo on sale at cabelas can be had cheap and when shtf type doesn’t count it’s a numbers game Aldo my lovely bride shoots the day light out of 9mm and found the 40 recoil in a poly pistol more than she cared for. As I said the 40 has it’s place just not in my arsenal I would rather choose guns that fit my profile there’s a reason I don’t own a 257 Roberts rifle too not because of ballistics just not practical

                Reply

  13. shockanawe Says:

    a 36″ zip tie put on someone’s neck is more affective than most handguns.

    Reply

    • anonymous aka nunya Says:

      Yeah, but I don’t want to get that close to an attacker, hence a firearm. This way I can ‘reach out and touch them’. Besides, they may have a 36″ zip tie FOR YOU. Nah, I’ll stick with my firearms. They are sufficiently effective.

      Reply

  14. nitrox Says:

    For me I decided that 9mm would be the best caliber for pre and post TEOTWAWKI scenario. for the same reason..

    1. Bullets are cheaper (brand new and reload)
    2. Its lighter to carry, more rounds on my BOB
    3. high capacity means more firepower in a gun
    4. Its the basic caliber of our law enforcement officer

    I also got the same gun model for my wife and kids and bought alot of magazine.

    Reply

  15. Luke O Says:

    I don’t like to critisize anyones choice of firearm, but I have and continue to do extensive reasearch on the subject. I personally don’t advocate .380 semi-automatics for personal and home defense. Two reasons: 1) underpowered for effective penetration. 2) .380 Semi-autos have the tendancy to jam / malfunction. I also don’t recommend subscribing to the “Get off Me” gun strategy, warning shots or shooting to wound an attacker. When a weapon is deployed it is done to stop control and neutralize a threat, shooting center mass, upper thoratic cavity and/ or head shots. Anything less is dangerous and bad advice. We shot to save our lives and mercy and the life of an attacker is not a concern when we feel our lives or the lives of our loved ones are threatened. Therefore, I always recommend no smaller that a 9 mm. (.40 S&W, 357 SIG, and .45 ACP are also good choices) for proper penetration. Lastly, just as imporantant as caliber is the type of ammunition, Ball ammo / Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) for tranining, due to cost, and hollow point for self defense for bullet expansion and to avoid overpenetration and shooting through the target. Generally speaking, select an ammo that has been tested in ballistic gel to around 12 to 14 inches of penetration. Some people will tell you that wound channel size with the larger cabliers is relevant. This is not nessasarily the case if the right ammo is selected.

    Reply

    • anonymous Says:

      I think handguns have their place in self defense but I really, really like my ‘zombie’ gun; 12 gauge, 3 round magazine extension (6+1)and 18.5 inch barrel. Loaded with 00 buck and slugs. I don’t care if you’re wearing kevlar or not, if you can stand after taking a one oz. slug center mass, at close range, you’re a badass. If you can’t, well…

      Also, my CCW instructor gave me some literature about the .40 round and its ballistic info. WOW!! More pop than a .45. Make ‘em hollowpoints and you’re good to go. And an extra loaded mag, JIC.

      Reply

      • shockanawe Says:

        Read the Defensive System Unit Ballistic Research Facility FBI Academy results from the autopsy of the 18 year old assailant in Pennsylvania on 11/29/2006. The FBI results were they were disappointed in performance of the AR-15 w/ 55 grain TAP ammunition, but satisfied the the 40 s&w 180gr wound cavities. The 40 s&w never penetrated more than one inch. even in the neck. They should have stayed with the full power 10mm instead of shortening the case for less powder. The 40 caliber 180 grain in a 10mm chronographs over 1,300 fps, while the same projectile in a 40 s&w is 990 fps. During local Defensive Pistol competions at or range in Basin, the 10mm can easily pass tire barriors while still hitting the point of aim on target. No other small caliber can. It has more energy @ 100 yards then the 45 ACP does out the muzzle. When your life is on the line, theat elimination is the goal, not annoyance of a .380 hoping they’ll leave.

        Reply

      • Joe Says:

        Yup anonymous. I love my 40 cal.

        As to the handgun vs shotgun part of your comment. I’d agree. Given the choice, I’d much rather protect myself with a shotgun. But I won’t have it with me all the time. It goes back to the distinction between personal defense and home defense. Walking through a parking lot to my car, I’ll reach for my handgun for protection. At home, the invader will hear the cha-chink of the shotgun.

        Reply

        • anonymous Says:

          I won’t let him hear it. Round is already chambered, just take the safety off and to quote Al Bundy “Let’s Rock”

          Reply

    • Joe Says:

      Hi Luke O. I really do appreciate your comment. Thanks for chiming in. (I didn’t take your humble comment as you criticizing a choose; rather sharing your perspectives and insight. It’s all in the delivery, my friend.)

      Anyway, I definitely agree that the 380 is on the lower, possibly the lowest, end of the stopping power required for self-protection. That’s why my go-to weapon for a post-TEOTWAWKI world is the .40 cal. It combines, in my opinion, the best of the 9mm and .45 cal ballistics.

      For the “normal” world where most people don’t carry concealed weapons and the rule of law is somewhat in effect, my belief is this:

      1) A get of me gun is of value since most criminals don’t expect to have any skin in the game. They assume that they will not get injured since the victim will be unarmed. Once they realize that they could be injured, they’ll flee and move on to another victim.

      2) A smaller, easier to carry gun that is always with you is far better than the bulkier gun with more stopping power that only gets carried occasionally since it cannot be easily concealed.

      There are, of course, exceptions to both of these assumptions. There are places in the world/US where #1 is not the case. There are people who can conceal a larger weapon so #2 isn’t valid.

      Anyway, just my thoughts on the matter. In recent years, several manufacturers have developed smaller and easier to conceal larger calibre handguns. A single stack .45 is not available so that may indeed change things.

      Joe

      Reply

  16. test Says:

    Asking questions are in fact nice thing if you are not understanding something completely, however this piece
    of writing presents good understanding even.

    Reply

  17. http://tinyurl.com/cewimote08375 Says:

    I actually tend to go along with everything that has
    been posted inside “Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions | PreppingToSurvive.

    com”. Thanks a lot for pretty much all the actual facts.
    Thank you,Andra

    Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. A Good Knife | PreppingToSurvive.com - May 20, 2011

    [...] Pre  And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  2. Book Review: Lights Out | PreppingToSurvive.com - May 27, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  3. Planning For Danger | PreppingToSurvive.com - June 23, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  4. Video Review: The Book Of Eli | PreppingToSurvive.com - June 29, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  5. Book Review: Desperate Times by Nicholas Antinozzi | PreppingToSurvive.com - July 19, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  6. A New Security Measure, Part 1 | PreppingToSurvive.com - August 9, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  7. The Little Things After TEOTWAWKI | PreppingToSurvive.com - August 30, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  8. Handguns: The Ultimate Tool for Self Defense | PreppingToSurvive.com - August 31, 2011

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  9. A Mini Milestone: Our Most Popular Posts | PreppingToSurvive.com - November 10, 2011

    [...] 3. Pre And Post Handgun Decisions [...]

  10. Spring Fatigue: Should I Store Magazines Fully Loaded? | PreppingToSurvive.com - February 3, 2012

    [...] Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions Share this:TwitterFacebookDiggStumbleUponEmailPrintLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. Hunting Weapons, Security, Self Defense ← Getting Children Involved in Preparing [...]

  11. 5 Home Security Measures that Don’t Need Electricity | PreppingToSurvive.com - February 7, 2012

    [...] Pre and Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  12. Please Burglarize Me! | PreppingToSurvive.com - March 8, 2012

    [...] Pre and Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  13. Our Most Popular Posts from the First 500 | PreppingToSurvive.com - November 29, 2012

    [...] 2. Pre And Post TEOTWAWKI Handgun Decisions [...]

  14. My Choice for One Blade, One Pistol, One Long Gun | PreppingToSurvive.com - January 21, 2013

    [...] my choice for a pistol would be the Springfield Armory XD-40. The .40 caliber round has great ballistics and combines the best of the 9mm and the .45 caliber. [...]

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,916 other followers

%d bloggers like this: